Abdominal Pain

Advice for Parents and Carers

If your child has any of the following:

  • Has dark green or bloodstained vomit
  • Has severe pain even after paracetamol or ibuprofen
  • Has testicular pain or swelling
  • Breathing very fast, too breathless to talk, eat or drink
  • Working hard to breathe, drawing in of the muscles below the ribs, or noisy breathing (grunting)
  • Breathing that stops or pauses
  • Is pale, blue, mottled or feels unusually cold to touch
  • Difficult to wake up, very sleepy or confused
  • Weak, high-pitched cry or can’t be settled
  • Has a fit (seizure)
  • Has a rash that does not disappear with pressure (the ‘Glass Test’)
  • Is under 3 months old with temperature more than 38°C or under 36°C (unless fever in the 48 hours following vaccinations and no other red or amber features

You child needs urgent help.

please phone 999 or go to the nearest hospital emergency (A+E) department

If your child has any of the following:

  • Has a swollen tummy
  • Has blood in their poo or wee
  • Has tummy pain that doesn’t go away for more than 1 day even after paracetamol or ibuprofen
  • Is very thirsty or is weeing a lot more than normal
  • Has yellow skin or eyes
  • Is losing weight
  • Is vomiting and unable to keep down any fluids
  • Breathing a bit faster than normal or working a bit harder to breathe
  • Dry skin, lips or tongue
  • Not had a wee or wet nappy in last 8 hours
  • Poor feeding in babies (less than half of their usual amount)
  • Irritable (Unable to settle them with toys, TV, food or hugs even after their fever has come down)
  • Is 3-6 months old with temperature 39°C or above (unless fever in the 48 hours following vaccinations and no other red or amber features)
  • Temperature of 38°C or above for more than 5 days or shivering with fever (rigors)
  • Temperature less than 36°C in those over 3 months
  • Getting worse or you are worried about them

You need to contact a doctor or nurse today

please ring your GP surgery or contact NHS 111 for advice – dial 111 or for children aged 5 years and above visit 111.nhs.uk

If none of the above features are present

The following conditions often cause tummy pain:

Watch them closely for any change and look out for any red or amber symptoms

Additional advice is also available for families for help cope with crying in otherwise well babies

If your child has a long-term condition or disability and you are worried please contact your regular team or follow any plans that they have given you.

 

Self care

Continue providing your child’s care at home. If you are still concerned about your child, contact NHS 111 – dial 111 or for children aged 5 years and above visit 111.nhs.uk

How can I look after my child?

  • Should include ensuring your child has regular food and drink (clear fluids) and regular pain relief (paracetamol/ ibuprofen should be given as per manufacturers instructions)

This guidance is written by healthcare professionals from across Hampshire, Dorset and the Isle of Wight.

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