Who should you speak to, if you feel unwell?

Self Care

For wear and tear, minor trips and everything in between.

Self-care

You can treat your very minor illnesses and injuries at home.

Some illnesses can be treated in your own home with support and advice from the services listed when required, using the recommended medicines and getting plenty of rest. 

Sound advice

Young people can recover from illness quickly but also can become more poorly quickly; it is important to seek further advice if your condition gets worse. 

School Nursing Team

School Nurses support young people and their families to ensure their health needs are supported within their school and community. They work closely with education staff and other professionals to support parents, carers and young people, with physical and/or emotional health needs. 

What does the school nursing team do?

The school nursing team consists of a school nursing lead, specialist public health practitioners and school health staff nurses. They all have a role in preventing disease and promoting health and wellbeing, by:-

  • encouraging healthier lifestyles
  • offering immunisations
  • giving information, advice and support to young people and their families

You can also speak confidentially to your school nurse about a range of issues including:-

  • relationships
  • bullying
  • HPV
  • friendship issues
  • staying safe
  • divorce
  • puberty
  • sleep
  • anger
  • contraceptive advice
  • smoking
  • healthy weight and eating.

Each member of the team also has links with many other professionals who also work with young people including child and adolescent mental health teams, community paediatricians and GPs. The school health nursing service also forms part of the multi agency services for children, young people and families where there are concerns about child abuse.

Sound advice:

Schools have an allocated school nurse – ask your school for the contact details of your school nurse.  

Pharmacist

Pharmacists are expert in many aspects of healthcare and can offer advice on a wide range of long-term conditions and common illnesses such as coughscolds and stomach upsets. You don’t need an appointment and many have private consultation areas, so they are a good first port of call. Your pharmacist will say if you need further medical attention.

Sound advice

  1. Visit a pharmacy if you are ill, but do not need to see a GP.
  2. Remember that if your condition gets worse, you should seek further medical advice immediately. 

NHS 111

If you’re not sure which NHS service you need, call 111. An adviser will ask you questions to assess your symptoms and then give you the advice you need, or direct you straightaway to the best service for you in your area.

Sound advice

Use NHS 111 if you are unsure what to do next, have any questions about a condition or treatment or require information about local health services. 

GP

GPs assess, treat and manage a whole range of health problems. They also provide health education, give vaccinations and carry out simple surgical procedures. Your GP will arrange a referral to a hospital specialist should you need it.

Sound advice

You have a choice of service:

  1. Doctors/GPs can treat many illnesses that do not warrant a visit to A&E.

Accident and emergency

A&E departments provide vital care for life-threatening emergencies, such as loss of consciousness, suspected heart attacks, breathing difficulties, or severe bleeding that cannot be stopped. If you’re not sure it’s an emergency, call 111 for advice.

Sound advice

  1. Many visits to A&E and calls to 999 could be resolved by any other NHS services.
  2. If your condition is not critical, choose another service to get the best possible treatment.

 

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